Power of attorney

By Martin Brieger, Site Editor.

A power of attorney gives someone else the power to handle your personal, property and financial affairs should you become incapacitated. Without one, using and accessing your loved one's estate can be extremely difficult.

 

You can also put into practice a power of attorney relating to your personal health and welfare. This will mean someone you trust has the authority to make decisions for you, such as:

  • Your daily routine including: your diet and how you dress.

  • The type of care you receive, and where you will be cared for.

  • The power to consent to or deny life sustaining treatment should you require it.

 

Powers of attorney such as this can only be used once you have lost the ability to make decisions for yourself, and once they have been registered. This power ceases after your death and your executors take over your affairs. It might be worth considering setting this up whilst writing your will document.

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